Words Words Words

Links to many online dictionaries for many professions.

DOWNLOAD

Many English lessons and English-Mongolian side-by-side PDF books

BUDDHISM.ANGLIHEL.COM

Learning English and Buddhism in Mongolia

MEDICAL.ANGLIHEL.COM

Learning Medical English for doctors, nurses and dentists in Mongolia

Friday, May 28, 2010

Jordan Romero, 13, 'becomes youngest to scale Everest'

A 13-year-old American boy has become the youngest person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, his family says.

Jordan Romero, from California, telephoned his mother from the peak of the world's highest mountain, she said.

"Mom, I'm calling you from the top of the world," Leigh Anne Drake quoted her son as saying.

He was climbing with his father and three Sherpa guides. The previous record was held by a Nepalese boy of 16.

The 13-year-old has now conquered the highest mountains on six of the world's seven continents.

He climbed Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro aged 10. He just needs to scale the Vinson Massif in Antarctica.

He has also scaled Mount Kosciuszko in Australia.

The team set off from Nepal's capital, Kathmandu, last month, heading for the base camp on the Chinese side of the mountain.

While Nepal insists that anyone planning to climb Mount Everest must be 16, China does not impose any age restrictions.

Some mountaineers have criticised the Romero family for letting him attempt the feat but his father said the ascent from the Chinese side is less dangerous, the AFP news agency reports.

Last month, his mother told the BBC he would do some school work during the trip.

Also on Saturday, Apa Sherpa, 50, climbed Everest for the 20th time, surpassing his own record.

Reference: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/asia_pacific/10141547.stm

3mph The Adventures of One Woman's Walk Around the World

by Polly Letofsky

On August 1, 1999, Polly Letofsky left her home in Vail, Colorado, and headed west. She traveled across 4 continents, 22 countries, and over 14,000 miles by foot to become the first American woman to walk around the world. As an awareness campaign for breast cancer, survivors and well-wishers around the world came out to walk with her. Every day strangers welcomed her into their homes and shared meals. Across four continents she had dinner conversations with poets, politicians, country singers, olive growers, pig farmers and the female bomb maker in Australia. The world had embraced her. But in the middle of Polly s five-year journey, the world suddenly shifted on its axis when September 11 flung us all into a crossroads in world history. To rapt audiences, she richly details her journey with humor and honest reflection, the good times and the hardships. She tells of how she took on the challenge of a life-long dream and learned quickly how to adapt to a swiftly changing world and to always live on the edge of her comfort zone. Sometimes serious, sometimes funny, always inspirational, Polly s program personifies the spirit of commitment and perseverance that will compel you to conquer life s challenges one step at a time.

Lessons from the Road:

The world is a pretty good place -- despite what we hear on the 6 o'clock news. Of course there were difficult times, I knew there would be. But the bumps in the road were the fabric that made up this journey, and just like our trek through life, it's the tough times that make us who we are, the character builders.

There's no greater education or means to personal growth than a walk around the world. Personally, I would like to see every political science, journalism and business major ditch their college thesis and instead spend their senior year walking across a country. Any country. Their assignments would be to talk to local farmers and businessmen, talk to locals at the "Ma and Pa" café, talk to local developers and mayors and the policemen that stop and ask what you're up to. When you're walking village to village talking to the local families, educators, politicians and road workers, and you sit around their dinner tables every night, you learn how various policies affect them, having to consider an entire set of elements that wouldn't be the case for the neighboring village, city or country. And incrementally you become a seasoned critical thinker.

knew this journey would be an education, but I was thinking more along the lines of languages, geography, history, but who could've guessed I'd learn so much about mango farming, the international trucking industry, or become knowledgeable about city planning, architecture, and not just languages, but the history of languages. My brain is stuffed silly with useless information I may never use again. (An upside is that recently the New York Times Crossword had the clue, "Smelly fruit in Malaysia" and without missing a beat I filled in D-U-R-I-A-N. It would hardly get me a job -- and it was the only answer I got -- but I stood proud if even for a moment.)

People often ask how this walk has changed me. I'm sure these five years have affected me in ways I'll never fully comprehend, but there are obvious changes, like the way I bond with strangers instantly, the way I react to a seemingly overwhelming task, or how I compartmentalize a difficult situation and just keep putting one step in front of the other until I'm past it. But I've also noticed changes full of contradictions.

When people frequently ask, "What were the best of times? The worst of times?" It's my observation that they were the same things. For example, I loved learning the languages and trying out a new word, marveling that the funny sounds coming out of my mouth actually communicated an idea, a mood or an action. On the other side of that, there were nights when I was so tired and grumpy, I just wanted to ask where the campground was and understand the answer.

Likewise, meeting locals from around the world was priceless. Staying at their homes, hearing about their lifestyles and the issues of their day in their industry, their country. The other side of that is that sometimes at the end of a long day I just wanted to sit in a hot tub, turn on CNN and not answer the questions, oh God, the incessant questions.

My biggest education by far, though, has been in my discovery of America. My patriotism surprises me because I don't recall giving two hoots about being an American or otherwise prior to leaving. But to travel through various cultures, particularly through what was this turbulent crossroads in world history, and discover the real meaning in freedom of religion, freedom of speech, free to be whoever you want to be, and to have equal rights protected by law, to discover my own roots and how this country helped shape who I am, those are my walk's greatest lessons.

The definition of walking around the world, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is that you have to walk at least 14,000 miles, and you need to start and finish in the same place and walk across at least four continents, and they say that when you get to the end of a continent you can fly. The numbers speak volumes about the lengths Letofsky went 14,124 miles across 22 countries in North America, Australia, Asia and Europe. Walking at an average of 15 miles per day for 1,825 consecutive days, or five years, she fundraised more than $250,000 for 13 breast cancer organizations and burned through 29 pairs of shoes.

Born on March 1, 1962, Letofsky first heard of and became fascinated with a global walk at age 12, when she read about David Kunst s 15,000-mile, four-year trek around the world. In her 30s, after having traveled the world in more conventional ways, the urge to walk around the world was still burning in the back of Letofksy s brain. For two years she struggled to find sponsors, while working part-time at a hotel. One day, in the middle of this stack of reservations I see this...piece of paper and on the top of it, it says, Definition of commitment: When you find a way over every hurdle in your path and nothing but success is an option. It took another year and a half before she secured enough sponsorships like New Balance Shoes and The North Face to provide products and services but never money before she was ready to hit the ground walking. On August 1, 1999, at age 37, Letofsky started in Vail, Colo., and on July 30, 2004, after selling her condo to help cover the costs of the last leg of her trip, she returned, having accomplished her goal.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Words Words Words: Mining

All the time I get requests for specific word lists for different professions. This week a friend who has a new job at a mining company asked for 'mining terms'.





MINING
Online Glossaries:

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Life's most valuable lesson: "I can"

Kiran Bir Sethi shows how her groundbreaking Riverside School in India teaches kids life's most valuable lesson: "I can." Watch her students take local issues into their own hands, lead other young people, even educate their parents.(Recorded at TEDIndia, November 2009, Mysore, India. Duration: 9:32)



The founder of the Riverside School in Ahmedabad, Kiran Sethi has launched an initiative to make our cities more child-friendly.

Why you should listen to her:

Kiran Bir Sethi's early training as a designer is clear in her work as an educator -- she looks beyond what exists, to ask, "could we do this a better way?" In 2001, she founded the Riverside School in Ahmedabad, designing the primary school's curriculum (and its building) from the ground up. Based around six "Beacons of Learning," the school's lesson plan focuses on creating curious, competent future citizens. The school now enrolls almost 300 children and has franchised its curriculum widely.

Sethi's latest project, inspired by dialogue with the children of Riverside, is called AProCh -- which stands for "A Protagonist in every Child." Fighting the stereotype of modern kids as rude and delinquent, AProCh looks for ways to engage Ahmedabad's children in modern city life, and to revamp our cities to make room for kids to learn, both actively and by example.

Kiran Sethi on the Web:
Website: schoolriverside.com
Website: AProCh.org

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

UB Post News 2010.05.25


Links to articles in the UB Post,
Ulaanbaatar's English-language newspaper
Website: http://ubpost.mongolnews.mn/



HOME NEWS
Trade Union Urges Government to Stop Manpower Export
Mongolia May Restart Child Money Program
Parliament Adopts National Reform Plan for Livestock

MINING & MINERALS
Khan Resources Admits CNNC Decision
SouthGobi Suspends Mongolia Mine Rail-Link Plan
Ivanhoe Says US$4.6 Billion Project May Get New Partner

POLITICS
Kuwaiti Prime Minister Meets Mongolian Ambassador
Indian Ambassador Presents Letter of Credence to Mongolian President
Negotiation Held Between Czech and Mongolian Premiers

CULTURE & ARTS
P.Battulga Wins Mongolian Photo Contest
Art Exhibition Opens at Mongolian Modern Art Gallery
Adornment for Mongolian Men Exhibition

ENTERTAINMENT
Mongolian Folk Art for UNESCO
Mongolian Cultural Days in New York
Utgiin Chimeg Festival of Short Story Wrap up

OPINION
Policy and Rate
Mongolia’s Mining Wealth is Cause for Concern
Impotence clarification

ECONOMIC
Italian Officials Visit - Beginning of Cooperation & Investment
US$50 Million Investment Needed for Zamin-Uud
February Economic Update: of Mongolia

BUSINESS
We Are About to Repeat the Greek Track
Joint Project of Government and Central Bank to Increase Capital
Central Bank May Declare Bankrupt of Anod Bank

SPORTS
Mongolian Judo Players Wins Bronze in IJF Rio de Janeiro Grand Slam
Hakuho Wins 14th Emperor’s Cup
B.Naranbaatar Wins Silver in IFWT Dagestani

TRAVEL
International Travel Mart Wrap-up
International Travel Mart at the Misheel Expo Center
The Culmination of The Mongolian National Revolution of 1911 or The Enthronement of Bogdo Jebtsundam

RESTAURANT REVIEWS
On Food
South Pacific
We All Need a Bit of Drama in Our Lives…
Mongolia’s very Own Central Park

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Thought Bubble: Kindness

ThoughtBubble.org teamed up with New York Times best-selling author Amy Krouse Rosenthal, to create this Thought Bubble on the power of kindness.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Mongolia Bike Challenge

1 Great Race
10 Stages
1400 kilometers
14000 meters of climbing
August 10-20, 2010

A long and tough race, open to competitive professionals as well as amateurs, which will take place across the solitary stepps of Mongolia from where in the 13th century mongolian shepherds were sent off by the brave Genghis Khan to a sudden and striking conquest of Central Europe, China and the Middle East.

The MONGOLIA BIKE CHALLENGE is not only going to be a mountain bike race in laps, but also and most of all a tough physical and psychological perseverance test, which every participant is going to be put through.


With the Power of Gengis Khan

The Mongolia Bike Challenge is a competitive sports event unique in its kind. It is a 1400 km mountain bike race divided in 10 laps, with a total of differences in altitudes of 14.000 mt.

Each participant is going to sleep in the tent villages, which are going to be set up immediately after finishing each lap and are going to be disassembled immediately before the start of the lap on the following day.

A long and tough race, open to competitive professionals as well as amateurs, which will take place across the solitary stepps of Mongolia from where in the 13th century mongolian shepherds were sent off by the brave Genghis Khan to a sudden and striking conquest of Central Europe, China and the Middle East.

The official start of the competition will be given by Ulaan Baator taking the runners across the stepps to the dunes of the GOBI desert, to be then taken back again north towards the taiga boreale (typical forest formation), forcing them to follow steep slopes with sprints up to 28 %.

The MONGOLIA BIKE CHALLENGE is not only going to be a mountain bike race in laps, but also and most of all a tough physical and psychological perseverance test, which every participant is going to be put through.

We are certain, that we can offer through this sportive event one of the most profound experiences a person could ever live.

In our lives we only remember the most intense moments and the Mongolian Bike Challenge is going to leave an indelible memory in anyone´s soul, of participating, facing and bring to an end one of the most important challenges.

An adventure of different times and an experience bound to leave a sign in the heart of every mountain bike race lover.

UB Post News 2010.05.11

Links to articles in the UB Post, Ulaanbaatar's English-language newspaper
Website: http://ubpost.mongolnews.mn/



HOME NEWS
KOREAN AIR PLANTS TREES IN BAGANUUR
Mongolia Celebrates World Press Freedom Day
Ulaanbaatar Launches Biggest Infrastructure Project

MINING & MINERALS
MONGOLIA APPOINTS THREE MEMBERS FOR OT BOARD
ING Appoints Investment Banking Head for Mongolia
Cash Minerals Acquires Mongolian Uranium Properties

POLITICS
PRESIDENT ELBEGDORJ STATE VISIT TO RUSSIA
President Ts.Elbegdorj Meets Chinese President Hu Jintao
Chinese Premier Wen Proposes Greater Economic Ties with Mongolia

CULTURE & ARTS
NATIONAL CALLIGRAPHY COMPETITION
Morin Khuur Fair Kicks-Off
Mongolia Marks 66th Anniversary of Army Generals

ENTERTAINMENT
INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF MORIN KHUUR WRAPS UP
New Documentary Movie in Theaters
P.Temujin Wins International Competition of Morin Khuur

OPINION
SANHATTAN
Donut Shops
Role of the Government

ECONOMIC
Italian Officials Visit - Beginning of Cooperation & Investment
US$50 Million Investment Needed for Zamin-Uud
February Economic Update: of Mongolia

BUSINESS
Central Bank May Declare Bankrupt of Anod Bank
Banking Experts Share Experiences with Mongolian Policy Makers
Banks Merger Finalized

SPORTS
Mongolia Wins One Gold and Two Bronze in International Open Jiu-Jitsu Championship
Mongolia Holds International Bike Tournament
Mongolian Taekwondo Team Grab Gold in Asian Taekwondo Championships

TRAVEL
International Travel Mart Wrap-up
International Travel Mart at the Misheel Expo Center
The Culmination of The Mongolian National Revolution of 1911 or The Enthronement of Bogdo Jebtsundam

RESTAURANT REVIEWS
On Food
South Pacific
We All Need a Bit of Drama in Our Lives…
Mongolia’s very Own Central Park

Sunday, May 9, 2010

Summer Classes start SOON!

ENGLISH ACTIVITIES AT FPMT MONGOLIA

Summer Intensive English classes to start soon! Registration for new students is on May 27th and classes will start on June 3rd for four weeks of intensive (5 days a week) till June 30th.

Register at FPMT Buddhist Meditation Center (Mahayana Center) across from Zanabazar Museum in the center of Ulaanbaatar (just look for the stupa in front).

SUMMER ACTIVITIES
Summer activities at the center include English Club on Saturdays from 1-2:00 and an afternoon Movie on Satudays from 3-5:00