Sunday, April 12, 2009

Be Kind Day 31 March

Well, we had our first "Be Kind Day" here in Ulaanbaatar on March 31st, 2009 and despite being planned at the last minute, surpassed all of our expectations.





A few of us at Shendrup Ling, an FPMT Buddhist Meditation Center, decided to involve children and young people of various ages for the events. The idea was "Let's see how kids express kindness through drawing, crafts and writing." Posters were translated into Mongolian and we placed them in several area schools, including an orphanage.



As our deadline approached, the staff were almost overwhelmed with submissions. There were over 130 entries. Children age of 7-10 years sent in drawings, while 11-15 year old kids did paper crafts. The teenagers, 15-18, wrote essays about their thoughts on kindness.



As can be imagined, selecting the best works from so many was quite intense for the staff. Ten year old Enkhtushig's drawing expressed that caring and giving support were ways to be kind. He also described that kindness for him meant being with his family. The winner of paper crafts described the traditional living style of Mongolians and how families support each other. Over half of the entries came from orphanage children. The winner of essay competition S.Enkhbulgan wrote that “kindness is a language which the deaf can hear and the dumb can speak” and further said that “kindness exits in the very deep in our hearts and it is shapeless, colorless and it doesn’t have any smell. That’s why kindness can be only expressed by ones’ actions and speech”. She has been living in an orphanage for many years but the strength and warmth of her words show she knows kindness both as a receiver and giver.




A little song and dance




A skit about Kindness




Just a few of the kids art




Showing the best drawing




Enkhbulgan reads her essay




Davaa & Glenda at the orphanage




A little girl reciting poetry




Glenda with our bilingual poster



For several weeks in April, some of the many drawings, paper crafts and essays were on public display at 'The Stupa Cafe' in Ulaanbaatar.



We are already planning to make next year even bigger, including all of Mongolia this time.